Everything You Should Know About ARCs

fd99d926r

Hello, everyone! You know how I’ve written not so long ago a post about reading slumps, well I figured out that I could also write ARCs 101 and I’m going to try to make a detailed post about everything you should know when it comes to Advance Review Copies from what they are, how you can get them, the pros and cons of them and so much more. Stick with me, hope it’s going to be a fun ride!

+UWC (3)

What is an ARC?

ARC is the abbreviation for Advance Review Copy, they are an uncorrected edition of an upcoming release that publishers usually send to bloggers, booktubers, librarians, booksellers and more. Its main purpose is for marketing, people that get ARCs for free will promote the book and spread the word about the new release therefore making more people buy it and read it.

There are also two types of ARCs : physical ARCs – which obviously means you get a physical copy of the book and e-ARC, which is an electronic copy.

+UWC (3)

Getting ARCs

I’m an international book blogger, which mostly means it’s harder for me to get ARCs – especially physical ones because I can’t go to book conventions, there are lots of publishers who can’t ship to my country. But I also feel like I get lots of ARCs taking these things into account. This list is made up by publishers that I’ve worked with before, so I can guarantee that they work with international bloggers.

Publishers that work with international bloggers and their contact info : 

Macmillan US : sales.international@macmillan.com – they’ve been very nice to me each time.

Pan Macmillan : childrensbooks@macmillan.co.uk – check their requirements before requesting ARCs from them though.

Penguin Random House : here is a form specifically for international bloggers.

Abrams : publicity@abramsandchronicle.co.uk – I’m sure they give ARCs in Europe, but I’m not sure about other regions.

Hot Key Books : they regularly do bloggers call outs on their Twitter, so you might want to follow them there and be on the lookout for their next blogger call. Also, I think this might be available just for Europe.

Usborne Publishing – they have a contact form that you can use (x), they replied to me within a day and they were really kind, so don’t worry about them not getting your message through the form.

I also know that HarperCollins works with international bloggers and I’ve heard this is their email : harpercollinsintl@harpercollins.com. I haven’t had much luck with them, but maybe you do!

Besides that, I know for certain that people at Simon & Schuster send e-ARCs to international bloggers. Whenever I worked with them, I looked for a certain ARC and got the correct contact info from the author’s contact page. I think you have a better chance to get the e-ARC by doing this instead of sending a message to their publicity team.

Netgalley and Edelweiss 

These two sites are amazing even though they sometimes can be very unfair to international bloggers. Also, if a book you want a lot is on wish for you, I’d suggest you try to contact the publisher because they might agree to send you a Netgalley widget which would give you immediate access to the book.

Authors

Authors might reach out to you if you have a review policy and some contact information on your blog. I’d recommend you to specify the genres you’re interested in reading, so you don’t receive emails with books that you’re unlikely to read.

+UWC (3)

What to include in your email

Besides the usual (your name, address, blog link, social media links, stats), you should also include some essential information as in : genres you usually review on your blog, books that you previously reviewed from the publisher, why you are interested in the ARC you’re requesting (what intrigues you about the plot, about the characters).

Also, let publishers know that you would be okay with an e-ARC if they can’t send you a physical copy if that’s the case. You have more chances to get the book if you do this, just trust me!

Also, Edelweiss has great catalogues that you can use to see what books each publisher is going to release and whether they have ARCs for them or not. These are very helpful and I’d recommend you use them!

+UWC (3)

Pros and Cons

Well, ARCs seem very shiny at first and you’ll probably be lulled to them like a sailor to a siren’s song because it’s a nice feeling when you get to read a book before it’s published. I know that at first, it seemed like such a huge achievement for me that I’d read that book before everyone else (or almost everyone else). But there are obvious cons to getting ARCs, for example : you might get a little too excited (especially if your requests are being accepted) and request too many review copies and then struggle to read them.

There’s also the issue that ARCs make us forget all about the poor backlist books. I haven’t read a backlist book in a while and sometimes I feel so bad about only reviewing ARCs on here, I’M SORRY GUYS ABOUT THIS, but I just have lots of them to read and review. They just took over my reading life and it’s totally my fault for not being keeping my requesting habits under control.

Also, there are some people who don’t like reviewing ARCs at all and they are totally valid. There isn’t just one stance on review copies and everyone is different. I know that I was super happy and enthusiast about them when I first started and while I still want to help authors a lot, sometimes reading ARCs can be very stressful especially if the request is accepted very late and I only have 3 days to read a book. It can be a lot. Just don’t be afraid to take a break when you feel like doing it.

Then there’s the privilege that comes with getting them, ARCs are mostly obtained by US bloggers, some Europeans bloggers also fare better than others, diverse readers don’t get as many chances to read books that represent them as they should. That’s all quite upsetting and I think everyone responds differently to it. I know when I first started, I’ve heard some US bloggers talk about how international bloggers don’t get ARCs and how we should just understand that and move on (don’t think every US book blogger is like this because I know lots of US book bloggers who are very supportive of international bloggers and I’m so thankful for them. I don’t want to generalize things in any way.) and it frustrated me to no end, but it also motivated me to try and grow my blog and reach out to publishers and promote books a lot. I know I probably had it a lot easier than many of you, but all I’m saying is that if you’re interested in ARCs and you’re an international book blogger, don’t give up!

I believe in you and I believe there are authors and publishers who want their books to reach a wider audience and impact readers from all the corners of the world.

+UWC (3)

International Book Bloggers Spreadsheet

Right now I’m working on a spreadsheet with international book bloggers that want to review and promote books. I’ll probably keep on adding bloggers on the list for a few days before I try to find authors and publishers who are interested in working with international book bloggers, so if you want to be on it, reply on Twitter, please!

Also, if you’re an US blogger and you want to help spread the word, RTs are most than appreciated!

file_002-46

Do you have some tips for bloggers who want to request ARCs?

Any publisher that you’d like to add to my list?

                                         Untitled-1titled-1h1

84 thoughts on “Everything You Should Know About ARCs

  1. Kelly says:

    Thank you so much for writing a post like this. As someone who is still relatively new to book blogging and reviewing (only launched at the end of April), this is such a handy post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      Yeah, they do and an international book blogger told me they accepted her request a while ago. I hope they still use it :-/ Hot Key Books are really nice and they publish amazing books! ❤
      You're welcome!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Marie says:

    Thank you for taking the time to write such an insightful post, Marta, that was so helpful and good to read ❤ I also love your pros and cons about ARCs. I have to admit that as a blogger, I felt quite accomplished and successful when I received my first ARC, though I know that linking blogging success to ARCs is TOTALLY WRONG (writing in all caps because it is WRONG), I couldn't help it and I know I can't help feeling that way haha. Yet it's so important to remember the pressure, responsibilities and overall the fact that it kind of takes over your reading, at times, too 🙂 x
    Thank you so much for sharing this – excited to see where this magical spreadsheet will go, thank you for this!! xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      YAY, it totally is wrong to measure a blogger’s success by ARCs. I still love ARCs and freak out whenever I receive another one, especially for books that I’ve been expecting for a long time. So, we’re both guilty of these things, I hope that we learn to let go of these worries and just go with whatever we want to do about blogging 🙂
      Same, I hope it gets somewhere and will get readers some amazing books! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      You’re most welcome! ❤
      I requested my first ARCs when I had 300-400 followers, I got them from Macmillan and they were really supportive and understanding about me being a new blogger.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      You’re welcome! ❤
      I know and it can be very hard to find out the international contact information, sometimes you have to go through so many US contacts to get to the right person if there is such a thing at all 😦

      Like

  3. David Boone (moonhawk81) says:

    Really nicely written, with plenty of helpful information. I used to be a beta reader for Hot Tree Editing, but–working two jobs–I really wasn’t able to devote myself to the task like I wanted, and stopped. Should I ever find a way to earn a living wage from one job, I’d love to go back to being a beta reader–I thoroughly enjoyed it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      Thank you very much! ❤
      I hope you manage to go back to your job as a beta reader, I never did it, but I always thought it was very interesting and probably very rewarding as well.

      Like

  4. Charlotte Annelise says:

    This post is really helpful! Thanks for going to the effort of putting all this info together 🙂 Sometimes it’s hard to figure out whether a publisher sends out arcs and where to request them. I mainly just use publishers from my country because I thought it would be easier but I’ll definitely check out those links you provided! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      It was my pleasure to put these up because it’s really hard to find some of these. I always feel so confused when there’s a general email address and no mention about whether the publisher works with international bloggers. So, I wanted to put this up for people who had doubts like me. It’s really nice that you can get ARCs from the publishers in your country. Since Romania isn’t an English-speaking country, I can only get finished copies in Romanian and I should also write reviews in Romanian 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Carolina @fictionologyst says:

    This is such a great and informative post! I’m an International blogger too and I have tried to email several publishers but I have no luck with them. I think I’m gonna try again soon!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      YES Carolina!! You really should try again because your blog is absolutely gorgeous (have no idea why I wasn’t following up to this point). I wish you good luck and happy reading! ❤
      Hopefully these tips will help you!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      I KNOW!!!
      I think I have that phrase blacklisted on Twitter because I don’t need to see all those amazing books that I can’t get *cries in international bloggers struggles*

      Like

  6. Rahil Shahril (@rahilshahril) says:

    Even for a new blogger in the book community, I can only imagine receiving arcs can be overwhelming! I have not received any arcs but yeah, I do believe that we could always deny a request if it ever pops up. I wouldn’t want to simply say yes to an arc and not liking it? Or to many arcs and find it that most of them are not up to my taste. But hey, we are not obligated to do anything just because everyone is doing it. Do what feels right to your gut. Review arcs only or review books you bought, or do both! I do believe that international bloggers are a bit tricky to get arcs because book conventions are mostly in the US but hey, you’re still a validated book blogger and blog the way you want to 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      ARCs are a bit addicting, hahaha, because I’m always requesting books that I really think I would enjoy, but I always end up with too many review copies because I become disinterested in some or I have a reading slump and they keep pilling up. It’s a bit tricky especially with how many other responsibilities that come with getting ARCs – writing the review, promoting it, creating moodboards and so many more.
      I agree with you, ARCs shouldn’t be a way to validate bloggers!

      Like

    • Marta says:

      You’re welcome, Caro!! ❤
      I think it's important to have this information listed out, so people have access to it and know their options. I know when I first started out, I was super confused about where to get ARCs and mostly found posts focused on english-speaking countries. So, yeah, we got to have more variety ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      Thank you very much, Kaleena! ❤
      You're doing an amazing job with Reading Around the Globe series, also your fixed thread on Twitter is marvelous! It's so frustrating whenever people assume things are the same everywhere and that reading is accessible everywhere in the same degree.

      Like

  7. Sissi @thebookworld20 says:

    This is a great post with lots of good information and tips! It’s also interesting that you mention the pros and cons of ARCs as I think it’s very important to realize ARCs take a lot of time to review (even though I’ve never asked for ARCs, I’ve heard it can become slightly stressful!). I hope to request ARCs as I continue to blog! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marta says:

      Thank you, Sissi! I’m glad you liked it and I thought it was necessary to mention those things because I thought ARCs were such a big deal when I first started out and I was freaking out a bit, I needed to get one, wow, how do I need one without really thinking of my responsibilities. So, it’s easy to just forget about those parts and for it all to become super stressful very soon.

      Like

    • Marta says:

      Aw, thank you! ❤
      I know where you're coming from, I was pretty lucky to meet some great bloggers that wanted to share with me different tips and contact information, which helped me a great deal. And it would be pretty unfair to keep all those for myself.

      Like

Leave a Reply to Marta Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s